What is an Islamic Pedagogy?

In the dialogue of Islamic Education, people think of two things: institutions or curricula. But what is the missing piece in this dialogue?

Dr. Nadeem Memon, the Program Director for the Islamic Teacher Education Program breaks down the missing piece, an Islamic Pedagogy, in this short video.

“An Islamic Pedagogy is the principles of education in Islam that inform both what we teach and learn, and the way we teach and learn… An Islamic Pedagogy provides a framework of the principles of education derived from the Islamic tradition that influence our approaches to schooling.”
— Dr. Nadeem Memon

Nadeem Memon

About Nadeem Memon

Dr. Nadeem Memon serves as Director of Education for Razi Education. He holds a Ph.D from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto on the history and philosophy of Islamic schooling. He also serves as Program Director for the Islamic Teacher Education Program, a project of Razi Education.
Click here to read more posts by Nadeem.


  1. Excellent video, Dr. Nadeem! I will circulate this to the Ontario Association of Islamic Schools mailing list. Hopefully, it will get people thinking in the direction of Islamic Pedagogy.

    • It would be wonderful to hear more about your school and how you feel an Islamic pedagogy can shift thinking within current practices. My contact information is on our website and it would be great to connect.

  2. Jazak Allah this is an interesting topic for discussion will explore with teachers in New Jersey.

  3. JazakumAllah khair for this video.
    I think that we can take most of the types of pedagogical practices that are being taught in western teacher education programs, in terms of day-to-day instruction methods (eg. cooperative learning) and use them – they are already “Islamic” – but what we can add is to SEE them as Islamic – so that we help administration and parents to see that these ways of doing things, different from the very industrial-era style education they experienced when they were students.
    The other element we can add, that is a clasically Islamic element of teaching but is found in many faith traditions of course, is the Murabbi-student relationship in which a teacher acts as not only the imparter of ideas, but the role model, the coach, the mentor, the upbringer, the guide, the supporter of the student’s personal, spiritual development. In order for this to happen, the school has to be supportive of this role, the teacher has to be aware of the potential he or she has to play this role and how to do it properly (safely, effectively, etc – it is a big trust from God and not to be taken lightly), and parents, if possible, should support this and not be jealous of the teacher’s role nor allow that role to be undermined by the student him or herself, when or if the process is challenging for that student (as all kinds of learning can be).
    This raises an important issue that you will hear from many teachers today: parents are in the business of defending their children; they are no longer partners who are willingly handing their children over to professional educators to do the best they can do. They allow their children to gripe (often in an unjustified manner) about the teachers, and they always take their children’s side in situations where there should not even be ‘sides.’ Muslim parents are very guilty of this, i am sorry to say. Gone are the days of the teacher or Murabbi being “loco parentis” – and this is sad for the Muslim community which shouldbe accustomed to and custodians of the idea of the Murabbi – a non-parental figure who is essential in the life of a child.
    May Allah show us the way to revive our traditions.

  4. to the Moderator: sorry, another mistake in my comment: the last sentence of the first paragraph should read:
    but what we can add is to SEE them as Islamic – so that we help administration and parents to see that these ways of doing things, different from the very industrial-era style education they experienced when they were students, are legitimate and in fact are themselves means of “teaching” Islam – since they train students to be patient, work with others, and develop good character all around.

  5. please give me another link to see this clip because you tube is banned in pakistan

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